Green hairstreaks at Barnack Hills and Holes

On the way back from a site survey in Cambridgeshire, I had the opportunity to call by and take my lunch break in Barnack Hills and Holes in the sunshine. Having seen a photograph posted by Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust the previous day, I knew that green hairstreaks were on the wing so I went off in hunt of these iridescent little jewels!

Green hairstreak (Callophrys rubi) can be hard to track down for a few reasons; firstly, they are wonderfully camouflaged against the leaves – seeing one at a flower can be almost like noticing that one of the leaves is drinking! Secondly, their populations can be small – some colonies are only a few individuals strong and so tracking them down on a large site could be time consuming.

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Spot the hairstreak drinking from the hawthorn flower!
Luckily, after a pleasant half an hour wandering through the cowslips and orchids, I came across several on a hawthorn shrub. It was a windy but sunny afternoon and this hawthorn bush was more sheltered than many others. When in flight, the butterflies reveal the brown uppers of their wings making them easy to spot on the wing – but they always rest with their wings held together and blend beautifully into the greenery.

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Green hairstreak amongst the hawthorn leaves
I watched two males take up sentry posts, settling on hawthorn buds or leaves, poised to leap into action and defend their territory against intruders. Other males were the most targets likely to be chased, along with other insects and butterflies of other species, but they also use this vantage point to spot females on the wing. When resting and waiting, these males tilted their wings towards or away from the sun, micro-managing their temperature with these movements.

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Male green hairstreak poised on a hawthorn bud ready to intercept intruders
Green hairstreaks are widely but locally distributed in the UK – this means there is likely to be a colony somewhere near you but they have particular habitat requirements so you might need to go to just the right place to find them. They occur in a range of habitat types including dry heathlands, grasslands, old railway embankments, woodland and quarries. The key habitat requirement seems to be open grassland with a good scrub component. Adult food plants include trefoils, vetches, hawthorn, gorse and spring flowers such as cowslip and bluebell. The larval food plants are similarly diverse including trefoils, dogwood, vetches, gorse and broom.

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Green hairstreak on a hawthorn flower – one of the favoured food sources for the imago (adult butterfly)
These butterflies are on the wing early in the year – often in April and early May through to early-June or perhaps later in the north. Barnack is a great place to spot them but this site can help you find a location near you!

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Green hairstreak standing guard over his territory on a hawthorn flower

2016 in Amphibians

Ecological consultancy work gives lots of opportunities to get up close and personal with reptiles and amphibians. One of our roles is to help our clients develop receptor sites, containing ponds, refuges, hibernacula and terrestrial habitat prior to site clearance. We then capture the reptiles or amphibians from the development site and move them to their new habitat to ensure that the populations can survive and grow into the future.

These are a few photographs of amphibians taken during 2016.

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Toads are not protected by the same legislation as great crested newts, but we always take the opportunity to move them to safety. I love how characterful toads can be, especially when you take their portrait!
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Translocating a number of animals at the same time lets you appreciate how variable they are. These are all portraits of smooth newts but the variation in colour is quite significant. To some extent this reflects gender and age, but also the natural variation which characterises any population of animal.
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A selection of toad portraits – these are one of my favourite animals and I wanted to try to capture them in such a way that you can appreciate the individuality of each and every one. The eyes of a toad are always surprising – the rich golden, reddish colour is quite beautiful if you get down to their level to appreciate it!
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A great crested newt from the translocation – these have much darker skin than the smooth newts as well as a much rougher texture. These animals spend much of their lives on land foraging for invertebrates during the summer or hibernating in a safe sheltered place during the winter. In the springtime however, all of the adults return to their ponds to breed.
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Palmate newts are relatively infrequent in the UK and certainly not common near to me. We went away for a few days around Easter and I nipped out to look in the ornamental pond behind our cottage at night to find a good population by torchlight. This male is showing off the distinctive back feet which help to identify this handsome creature from the superficially similar smooth newt.
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Three juvenile amphibians from a translocation check – from left to right is a great crested newt, a smooth newt and a toad. These were all released into their new receptor site where there are refugia and habitat to allow them to develop on into adults and help to sustain the population into the future.

If you are interested in commissioning amphibian surveys in the midlands, you can check out Landscape Science Consultancy’s website here!